Back

Suit Yourself™ International Magazine #41: Nescience Is The Price For Losing Euclid

  

****

Suit Yourself™ International Magazine  #41: Nescience Is The Price For Losing Euclid

****

TOP

This is the 41st in our articles series and I hope this information is helpful.

All previous articles in the series can be found in our Library:
https://suityourself.international/libraryindex.html
and in the Magazine Archives:
https://suityourself.international/appanage/index.php?_a=newsletter
If you are experiencing problems viewing this newsletter in email, please use one of these links.

Upon request, reprint permission and an addendum of substantiating resources are available for all magazine articles. When requesting reprint permission or addenda, please include the issue date and full issue title. All magazine articles are copyright © Debra Spencer, Suit Yourself ™ International. All rights reserved. ISSN 2474-820X.
 

****

The Argo approaching the Symplegades, the crushing rocks, on the way to Colchis, at The End Of The World, where lies The Golden Fleece.

****

 

NESCIENCE IS THE PRICE FOR LOSING EUCLID

****

 Click on a section to jump to it:

1. Nescience Is The Price For Losing Euclid

2. Modern Society Modern Mind

3. Resisting Modern Education

4. Humans Are Already Robots

5. Humans Are Things That Go Bump In The Night

6. Whatever Did I Do Without My Brain?

7. The Antikythera

8. Ancient Myths As Chemical Theory Conduit Metaphors

9. Algebra versus Euclid's Elements: Bean Counting versus Critical Judgement

10. To Conclude

11. Additional Resources

 

****

 

This is a rather long essay on the cost of ignorance, for which I apologize in advance. This magazine will bore those of you wanting to learn all there is to know in one email; I just don't go there. 


***


Even a paperclip can cause a slip; NY Telephone Company.

***

Right now, we're directly observing the very real effect of the total lack of accurate knowledge of scientific matters by the American public, and the consistent appalling "standards" of public education. 

As readers of this magazine probably know by now, I enjoy applying different points of view to examine apparently trivial things, especially those our culture discards, ignores, or otherwise takes for granted. Besides being fun and enlightening, it's remarkably profitable to delve deeper after others are all done. I let them clear the debris, and this makes finding buried treasure much easier. 
    
For example, I make a hobby of tracking science in Ancient Greek Myths. In upcoming issues, I'll share some of these discoveries, including significant chemistry in myths such as The Golden Fleece, and aurophilicity, a relatively recent discovery (pun intended) of relativistic effects in the elements.    

Why do I study ancient texts?  The Ancient Greeks successfully did what we can no longer do, and they did it with far fewer resources than we have now. They were better at this than we are. Their civilizations hold many useful suggestions for us, now. 

The Ancient Greeks, incredible as it may seem, knew much of what we used to know, what we've forgotten and now need to remember, and more besides. Most importantly, they knew how to know. Unfortunately for us, their wisdom has becoming increasingly difficult to acquire and for our modern minds to grasp and extract. 

Everywhere, our inability to accurately assess risk is evident. There are forces at work in our world undermining every available attempt at clear thinking. 

There is an exponential rise in inappropriate extreme reactions to insignificant things, and a corresponding total lack of awareness and response to genuine threats. As a result, we are making very little progress on things that really matter, while significantly overreacting to all the rest. We do not know the forest from the trees.


***


Better living through reckless experimentation.

***

The Dunning–Kruger cognitive bias is evident everywhere; we don't know what we don't know. People with little ability don't realize it because they lack the ability to accurately evaluate and objectively assess their own levels of competence and incompetence. Likewise, persons of high ability tend to underestimate their relative competence, erroneously presuming that tasks easy for them are also easy for others.  

As described by social psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger, "the miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others."   Kruger and Dunning's 1999 study is titled "Unskilled and Unaware of It: How Difficulties in Recognizing One's Own Incompetence Lead to Inflated Self-Assessments". In 2000, Kruger and Dunning were awarded the satirical Ig Nobel Prize for their work; their facts should be self-evident yet cannot be so. In 2003, continuing their research with "Why People Fail to Recognize Their Own Incompetence", they indicated that much incorrect self-assessment of competence derives from a person's ignorance of a given activity's standards of performance, and training in a task increases people's ability to accurately evaluate how good they are at it. 

***


If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

***


Authorities across all fields are failing; they are too ignorant to respond properly to any real threat and cannot be trusted. When authority in general cannot be trusted, the schools which instruct authority also cannot be trusted.  Questions frequently arise that those in authority are not financially motivated to respond in anyone's interest but their own. The propaganda and ignorance of the news media is even worse. The entire structure of society fails. 

Police and fire officers, for example, are probably even more ignorant of radioactive threats than chemical ones, and unable to read hazmat sheets intelligently, if they even know what they are. There is a great deal of militaristic mimicking, including the carrying of weaponry they barely know how to use, however necessary for their protection in a violent society. 
    
Brick and Mortar United States Post Offices are now forbidden to publicly acknowledge Holidays with any decoration. They're identical to their totally impersonal online equivalent; an online message will summon a post person to pick up packages from your premises, you can buy stamps by mail, and there's no incentive to patronize any actual post office prison in person.  

Both business and consumers remain naive, apathetic and inattentive to the repercussions inherent in loss of individual privacy and the accelerated evolutionary path of cybercrime and exploit kits. There is no accurate appreciation or understanding of the depth and breath of these very real threats. Instead, there is complete denial and a total lack of comprehension of the magnitude, which is on an organized industrial scale. Even victims remain incredulous, persisting in perceiving themselves as isolated cases and exceptions to some imaginary nonexistent norm. For more information on this, see the references below on cybercrime and cyber forensics.

The Know-It-All-Already attitude persists; there is complete denial alongside great confusion.  In this regard,we are sitting ducks.
    


***


We're sitting ducks.

***


All the 'experts' tell us we're fast becoming a race of idiots because there is too much to learn now, more so than ever before. This is utter nonsense. Au contraire, we're becoming stupid because the majority no longer do what is necessary to learn what's already on offer. Knowledge is increasingly available only to those few with the resources to acquire it and exploit it. 

For all our technology, we are not doing things more efficiently; instead we are automating what we can to increase profit margins, increasingly segmenting and limiting choices, and ignoring a steadily increasing error rate while depersonalizing most human interaction.  
    
Our current proliferation of modern technology is matched by a simultaneous unparalleled decrease in our ability to understand and use, intelligently and benevolently, what we already have available. Instead, with our nonrenewable resources, we are reckless, profligate, and mind-bogglingly wasteful.

No amount of "brain enhancement" or "computer science" or "artificial intelligence"  will help us if there is nothing worth enhancing in the first place.

We need to use what we already have efficiently and effectively, by understanding it more profoundly, to do more with less. And that's precisely what we aren't doing.  

 For all our technology, our current knowledge and understanding is proving too shallow to make much headway on solving or outgrowing existing problems. All we're able to do is temporarily change the problems.We cannot rely on or expect anything we produce to be clearer than we are. Given our current state, so called Artificial Intelligence can only be faster at creating more confusion. 

Modern technology and modern non-education is turning all of us into replaceable fungible dependent robots; it is only a matter of time. 

We might as well chase our own tail. 

***


Counterproductive sanitation measures: wash your hands and then have them manually inspected!

***

 


***

GO TO TOP 

***

2. MODERN SOCIETY MODERN MIND

***

Why do we miss opportunities, even when they're staring us in the face?  Perhaps it's because our culture trains us to do so. 


***


You're Not Paid to take risks.

***


The philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein once said that the limits of our language are the limits of our world. Opportunities are recognized by perceiving their value but this requires simultaneously holding multiple points of view, and most of us use only one point of view, one set of values, as we go through life. 

If we think about this at all, we prefer one point of view, one set of values, to set our goals, make our choices, estimate our risk reward ratios, and judge our progress. Living life through one set point of view, we're wearing blinders we don't know we're wearing, and we'll miss opportunities we won't recognize as valuable to others.


***


All the eyes are looking in the same direction.

***


Also, many of us won't voluntarily tackle extra challenges. It's not that we're lazy, impatient, easily discouraged, and give up too easily. Modern life throws us so many curve balls not of our own choosing that we're worn out,  and dull looks good. This makes it easy to forget the fact that voluntarily accepted challenges are invigorating, offer a cure, and are of an entirely different nature.

In addition, I'm constantly informed by the WSJ and others that our current attention span has been trained by our culture to be limited to one data bit at a time, with a maximum of five minutes including two breaks. Nothing at all worth learning can be acquired in this way. So, thanks for reading.

Our Western world has barely survived our past intellectual collapses. Our modern world is inundated with ongoing wakes of intellectual subterfuge, riddled with the accompanying mental cavities and general decay into cynicism, narcissism, and superstition. 

Modern minds are not being equipped to make the enormous perceptual stretch to perceive these things let alone sustain the effort required to reinterpret them. The knowledge that is the foundation of our world is fast disappearing and the shards left have become increasingly difficult to get at. Modern interpretations, using modern points of view, have made a mockery of them.

To understand and use any advanced course in anything requires maturity in addition to manipulative skills. Like practice playing musical scales, much the same ground must be covered over and over, in iterative passes, going deeper each time. This is the only way a good understanding of anything worthwhile can be acquired. Practice makes perfect. Mastery develops with dedication, perseverance, practice and time; it is a never ending, ongoing process, requiring decades of dedicated, sustained impartial effort.  The Hindu word for this process is YOGA.

 It is sobering to realize how fragile the hold on such knowledge is, how easily it is disappearing, and how difficult, if not impossible. it will be to recover.

 

***

GO TO TOP 

***

3. RESISTING MODERN EDUCATION

It's ironic to consider that both "school" and "scholar" are from Greek "schole", spare time, and that "student" is from "studium", zeal.

Fewer and fewer students are equipped to scale the needed heights. Modern education fails to educate. "School Education" is an oxymoron. Most aspects of reasoning have been purged from education, especially here in the United States, and replaced by a cult of manipulation and following rules and prescriptions. Instead of "education", teaching and academia focus on completely precluding critical judgment, not offending anyone, on funding, and grading on presentation, arithmetic, and tricks, training a student only so far as their destination in the social machine merits, and not one step further. This creates a servile labor force, as a virtual herd of mindless consumers, cultivated, tended, and waiting to be exploited, by commercial industry.

***


Safety is as simple as ABC Always Be Careful. Notice that they don't tell you how!

***

John Taylor Gatto has valid grounds for stating this problem is deliberately orchestrated.  An outspoken critic of the public school system, he was named New York City Teacher of the Year in 1989, 1990, and 1991, and New York State Teacher of the Year in 1991. His books examine the history, root-causes, and consequences of public schooling, and the deliberate, systematic, ubiquitous "dumbing down" of American. See the bibliography below in Additional Resources. 

***


Occupied or Vacant?

***


He puts the answer in context, and most succinctly, in his essay 'Against School' (2003).He states: "The great H. L. Mencken, who wrote in The American Mercury for April 1924 that the aim of public education is not to fill the young of the species with knowledge and awaken their intelligence. . . . Nothing could be further from the truth. The aim.. . is simply to reduce as many individuals as possible to the same safe level, to breed and train a standardized citizenry, to put down dissent and originality. That is its aim in the United States . . . and that is its aim everywhere else. " 


He continues: "Maturity has by now been banished from nearly every aspect of our lives. Easy divorce laws have removed the need to work at relationships; easy credit has removed the need for fiscal self-control; easy entertainment has removed the need to learn to entertain oneself; easy answers have removed the need to ask questions. We have become a nation of children, happy to surrender our judgments and our wills to political exhortations and commercial blandishments that would insult actual adults. We buy televisions, and then we buy the things we see on the television. We buy computers, and then we buy the things we see on the computer...And, worst of all, we don't bat an eye when Ari Fleischer tells us to "be careful what you say," even if we remember having been told somewhere back in school that America is the land of the free. We simply buy that one too. Our schooling, as intended, has seen to it."


"School trains children to be employees and consumers; teach your own to be leaders and adventurers. School trains children to obey reflexively; teach your own to think critically and independently. Well-schooled kids have a low threshold for boredom; help your own to develop an inner life so that they'll never be bored. Urge them to take on the serious material, the grown-up material, in history, literature, philosophy, music, art, economics, theology - all the stuff schoolteachers know well enough to avoid. Challenge your kids with plenty of solitude so that they can learn to enjoy their own company, to conduct inner dialogues. Well-schooled people are conditioned to dread being alone, and they seek constant companionship through the TV, the computer, the cell phone, and through shallow friendships quickly acquired and quickly abandoned. Your children should have a more meaningful life, and they can."


"First, though, we must wake up to what our schools really are: laboratories of experimentation on young minds, drill centers for the habits and attitudes that corporate society demands. Mandatory education serves children only incidentally; its real purpose is to turn them into servants. ...After a long life, and thirty years in the public school trenches, I've concluded that genius is as common as dirt. We suppress our genius only because we haven't yet figured out how to manage a population of educated men and women. The solution, I think, is simple and glorious. Let them manage themselves." John Taylor Gatto, 'Against School', 2003. Complete Text Online at http://www.wesjones.com/gatto1.htm

***

 

***

GO TO TOP 

***

4. HUMANS ARE ALREADY ROBOTS

***


Obey! Never trust your own eyes, believe what you are told.

***

 

Below is a quote from the Nobel press release on 2 October, 2017 at https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/2017/press.html

"Press Release 2017-10-02 The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has today decided to award the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm. Life on Earth is adapted to the rotation of our planet. For many years we have known that living organisms, including humans, have an internal, biological clock that helps them anticipate and adapt to the regular rhythm of the day. But how does this clock actually work? Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young were able to peek inside our biological clock and elucidate its inner workings. Their discoveries explain how plants, animals and humans adapt their biological rhythm so that it is synchronized with the Earth's revolutions. Using fruit flies as a model organism, this year's Nobel laureates isolated a gene that controls the normal daily biological rhythm. They showed that this gene encodes a protein that accumulates in the cell during the night, and is then degraded during the day. Subsequently, they identified additional protein components of this machinery, exposing the mechanism governing the self-sustaining clockwork inside the cell." "We now recognize that biological clocks function by the same principles in cells of other multicellular organisms, including humans. With exquisite precision, our inner clock adapts our physiology to the dramatically different phases of the day. The clock regulates critical functions such as behavior, hormone levels, sleep, body temperature and metabolism. Our wellbeing is affected when there is a temporary mismatch between our external environment and this internal biological clock, for example when we travel across several time zones and experience "jet lag". There are also indications that chronic misalignment between our lifestyle and the rhythm dictated by our inner timekeeper is associated with increased risk for various diseases."


***


More and more robots.

***

The release continues: "Other researchers found that not only plants, but also animals and humans, have a biological clock that helps to prepare our physiology for the fluctuations of the day. This regular adaptation is referred to as the circadian rhythm, originating from the Latin words circa meaning "around" and dies meaning "day". ..."The biological clock is involved in many aspects of our complex physiology. We now know that all multicellular organisms, including humans, utilize a similar mechanism to control circadian rhythms. A large proportion of our genes are regulated by the biological clock and, consequently, a carefully calibrated circadian rhythm adapts our physiology to the different phases of the day (Figure 3: The circadian clock anticipates and adapts our physiology to the different phases of the day. Our biological clock helps to regulate sleep patterns, feeding behavior, hormone release, blood pressure, and body temperature)."


Consider the following quotes from a WSJ article of Saturday / Sunday October 28-29, 2017, titled "Keeping Up With The Machines", written by Christof Koch, president and chief scientist of the Allen Institute of Brain Science in Seattle:

"We must create technologies to enhance the processing and learning capabilities of the human brain." Koch also states: "People could get their brains to keep their focus on a task for hours on end, or control the length and breath of their sleep at will."

***


Keep your eyes on the job.

***

Just whom would this benefit? Not those whose brains are doing it. The 2017 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine would argue against any meddling with sleep functions.  

Christof Koch states: "At some point, the pace of progress will exceed the ability of individuals to adapt; this could prove catastrophic."

Well, really now, none of us run as fast as our cars can go, but so what? This doesn't make us defective and in need of improvement. Based on his statement, cars, computers, boxed lunches, telephones and velcro could qualify as catastrophic.

Our culture has tried to convince us for decades that there's something fundamentally wrong with the human brain that needs improving. Who is doing the judging? Who is "in charge" of "enhancements and improvements"? Are IQ tests actually testing relative compliance? 

Edward Bernays, the true father of propaganda, knew all about neural plasticity in the early 19th century. Bernays claimed propaganda was fair because both sides had the same tools, and he claimed this was also the only disadvantage, that the enemy had access to the same techniques. Of course, Bernays never acknowledged the fact that it costs a great deal of money and skill to influence public opinion, and most of us have neither the means nor the skill to effectively combat those who do.

***


Consume!

***

In spite of the facts stated in the above Nobel press release, Christof Koch advocates cortical neuron implants and adapters, and not just for humans who have sustained severe physical damage and trauma, but for all of us; in his opinion, we all "need improvement" and "it may well be catastrophic" for poor defective impoverished humanity to try to keep up with all this imposed technology without his help. 


***


The robot slips on an unexpected banana peel.

***

Christof Koch advocates cortical neuron implants and adapters as a panacea for the very ills that the culture is perpetuating through lack of legitimate education, and the resulting ignorance. 

Turn us into soldiers indeed. If you think I'm kidding, read what he has to say about this. Koch states: "To accelerate the diffusion of this technology, the relevant government agencies, academia, the biomedical device industry and the smaller companies that are the true risk takers and pioneers must freely, openly and rapidly share data and procedures to speed up innovation. And we must shorten the very lengthy regulatory process to quickly bring these benefits to everyone."

Do I really have to "unpack" the horror embedded here?

***


Virtual reality "glasses".

***

Koch ends by stating "The 21st Century will be the century of the brain." 

What nobody tells you is that the past 20th Century already was "the century of the brain". 

With this current acceleration of enforced technological addiction, there won't be much left of our brains anytime soon.  There isn't now.


***


Day brains are dull while night brains are active.

***

As Hans Moravic predicted in the 1970's, humans will replace themselves with their own creations, decided upon by the few, and will otherwise go extinct. It is inevitable and only a matter of time.

Dystopian? Not if I can help it. That's why I'm writing, carefully, and with rigor, and self-publishing as much as I can.

In direct contrast to Christof Koch's statements are the warnings of Dr. Miguel Nicolelis, in the WSJ Article "The Perils of Putting A Chip In Your Brain"  (page 58, WSJ "The Future of Everything, November - December 2017). He cites the brain's remarkable plastic adaptability, which doesn't require either a direct or continuous connection to become addicted. Simply having access to technology changes behavior in fundamental ways.

***


Ping pong brain.

***

Having continuous access to computers has apparently the same effects as being connected directly. Dr. Miguel Nicolelis states: "Connected to a computer, the brain adapts almost at once, taking on the characteristics of the machine and mimicking its' binary decision-making process. Our brains don't even require a direct connection to perform this trick. Continuous access to computers can have this effect. If people know information is available on the internet, they begin forgetting it, including their address and phone number. It's symptomatic of a problem that is already costing lives."

***


Oculus virtual reality headset.

***

"Automation addiction" has chilling repercussions. According to the article, Brainets, interconnected brains, have already been proved possible, as has "hacking" of these "systems", accessing and manipulating the thoughts and actions of connected individuals. Dr. Nicolelis states "Military uses of brain-machine interfaces should be banned by the international community along with poison gas and other weapons of mass destruction."

***


Brainets.

***

Apparently, much of what we think of as our "brain" is in fact our software operating system. Our responses to our environment rewrite our software. We are able to rewrite, curtail, and states Dr. Nicolelis, "even erase the central aspects of "humanity" - sympathy, intuition, creativity, improvisation, artistic and social skills." By changing our values, our choices change, as do the problems we chose to solve and how we find solutions.

Dr. Nicolelis continues: "The paradoxical lesson I've learned in nearly 30 years of solving problems is this: Technology will not solve all our problems. The human brain should be revered as something exquisite and unique. We need to rethink the role of digital systems in education and insure that humans - not machines, or humans joined to them, control the creation and decision-making process for art, science, politics, and all the things that define us. Digital technology will never surpass what our brains can do- but it can shape them, and that is the biggest danger."

***

 

***

GO TO TOP 

***

5. HUMANS ARE THINGS THAT GO BUMP IN THE NIGHT

***

Apparently the actual brain itself is far more fragile than we have been openly admitting. There has been a systematic denial of concussion as a developing illness, particularly in the young. The documentation is indisputable on the subsequent long term accumulating affects of even a so-called "mild concussion" at any age. Essentially, there is no such thing as a "slight" or "mild" concussion.  

In spite of the documentation, young people diagnosed with a so-called "slight concussion" are sent back to school, and contact sports, after a few days off with no more than a few words. Certainly nobody is required to warn these young people what future symptoms might signal a warning, and no information about possible accumulative or developing damage is required to be given to these children or their parents. 

***


Do not adjust machinery in motion; stop it first.

***

It is quite probable that most public high school aged children given a "slight concussion" diagnosis do not even understand what a concussion is, nor the criteria that was used for the diagnosis, yet for the rest of their lives, and especially for their immediate future, they now carry a permanent risk susceptibility to brain function problems.

For example, school nurses are not required to discuss the permanent repercussions of overstretched ligaments with these young people. Ligaments do not have the blood flow that muscles have; ligaments are viscoelastic. They gradually strain when under tension, and when tension is removed, they attempt to return to their original shape however they cannot do so once they've been extended beyond a certain point, or for a prolonged period of time. 

***


Concussion brain bashing.

***

Trauma related to even a "slight" or "minor" concussion diagnosis includes trauma to the brainstem and to ligaments. Concussion is a developing illness and problems can and do continue to develop over time, often manifesting months or years after a diagnosis of a "slight" or "minor" concussion.  

For example, trauma to the brainstem can result in later developing abnormalities in the function of cranial nerves that may lead to facial palsy, facial ticks, visual disturbances, pupil abnormalities, vision changes, changes in sensation, muscle weakness, hearing problems, vertigo, swallowing and speech difficulty, voice change, co-ordination problems, cardiovascular system changes, and slowly accruing alterations in personality, alertness, awareness, attentiveness, and consciousness. 


***


From CNN.com; what a concussion does to neurons in the brain over time.

***

More information related to this can also be found in the  article by Jason Gay, "Don't Play The Hits", WSJ, "The Future of Everything" November / December, 2017 Pages 70-72. In the article, NFL Quarterback Drew Bres discusses the long term physical impact of  contact sports, suggests alternatives, and discusses the widespread longstanding denial of the posthumous diagnosis of cerebral difficulties associated with contact sports, as well as his work to offer flag football as a viable alternative at the school level.

***

 

***

GO TO TOP 

***

6. WHATEVER DID I DO WITHOUT MY BRAIN?

***

Remember the phrase "I can't think what I ever did without it!"? The brain adapts immediately to using tools, and then humans build infrastructures requiring the use of these tools. Not only does the individual immediately adapt, but the society does also, and the culture, along with its' infrastructure, also quickly adapts, adopts, and becomes "automation addicted".

***


Smoke is coming out of both ears; Ray Walston in the 1963 TV series "My Favorite Martian".

***

Not all "labor saving devices" are bad for you, however you should be aware that there are trade offs when you use them, and those trade offs involve increasing dependency on the device in direct proportion to loss of self-sufficiency.


***


Ray Walston activating his antennae in the 1963 TV series "My Favorite Martian".

***

Self-sufficiency was once linked to the concepts of independence and freedom.

Learning to start a fire from scratch is very difficult and most of us don't know how to do it.  Genuine cooking from scratch is another example; most of us use shortcuts. We are no longer as self-sufficient as we may think we are.

The phrase "Use it or lose it" comes to mind because the reverse is also true: "Lose it when you use it."

***

 

***

GO TO TOP 

***

7. THE ANTIKYTHERA

***


Front panel of a 2007 recreation, a model of the Antikythera, the earliest computer orrery, in a see-through lucite casing.

 

***

The Ancient Greeks demonstrated repeatedly that we don't need bigger enhanced brains to play catch up, any more than they did. Unlike us, the Ancient Greeks put their profound knowledge and understanding to practical use, and it enabled them to make remarkably ingenious uses of available resources.


***


Animation of the Antikythera's front panel, showing the interlocking gear mechanisms for the cyclical calendar of planetary orbits.

***

The Antikythera mechanism is but one example. This sunken ancient Greek Antikythera mechanism was discovered in 1902. We've been studying it ever since. Scholars disagree on the date of origin but all agree it is BC. It bears instructions composed in Koine Greek. Only recently has consensus been reached on its' function, that it is a sophisticated analog computer orrery. This makes it abundantly clear that the Ancient Greeks knew far more than we do, about a great deal, and they used what they knew very differently than we do. Their values were fundamentally different from ours.  


***


Comparative animation of the Antikythera from Stephen Wolfram.

***

The Antikythera mechanism functions as the result of a stunning coordination of dozens of interlocking sequenced gear mechanisms, hand milled from different alloys that affect performance. The level of miniaturisation and design complexity is staggering, revealing a theoretical comprehension beyond the scope of the engineered precision of the parts. The result is a functional calculator computer orrery, based on a massive library of astronomical, mathematical and scientific data, using no independent power source other than hand cranking. An abacus is to the Antikythera mechanism as a papyrus is to the internet, and there are few alive today capable of such a feat from scratch. It would certainly appear that the later introduction and use of Volvelles in Europe in the 14th Century was patterned after the much earlier Antikythera mechanism.


***


Artistic animation of the Antikythera's sophisticated interlocking gear mechanisms.

***

Volvelles are later manifestations of the Antikythera mechanisms' concept, however volvelles are made from paper, not metal. Volvelles were introduced to Europe in 1302 by artist and writer Ramón Llull, who worked in the Kingdom of Majorca (present-day Spain).

Volvelles are early examples of paper analog computers; they're constructed of rotating nested concentric circles of paper. The word "volvelle" comes from the Latin verb "volvere", to turn. It is occasionally seen spelled as vovelle, while its' moving parts are sometimes referred to as rundells.

The Astronomical Vovelle, pictured below, is from Astronomical and Medical Miscellany, English, late fourteenth century, shortly after 1386; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XII 7, fol. 51

Layered circles of parchment are held together at the center by a tie, allowing the user to rotate pointers to calculate the position of the sun (Solis) and moon (Luna) at different points throughout the year. A circle with letters in red also indicates the astrological sign associated with each period. This example, in spite of inspiring much manipulation and movement, has remained intact since its' creation around 1386. 

***


For more information, please see http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/decoding-the-medieval-volvelle/

***

In the rotating paper Volvelle below, 24 hourly divisions divide the circle; this volvelle was used as a cipher disc in Johannes Trithemius’ cryptographic book ‘Polygraphy,’ published in Paris in 1561. This book was owned by John Dee and is now in the library of the Royal College of Physicians.


***


24 hourly divisions on this rotating paper volvelle used as a cipher disc in Johannes Trithemius’ cryptographic book ‘Polygraphy,’ published in Paris in 1561. 

***

For more information, please see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volvelle
and
http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/decoding-the-medieval-volvelle/

***

GO TO TOP 

***

8. ANCIENT MYTHS AS CHEMICAL THEORY CONDUIT METAPHORS

 

***

Ancient myths are not patchworked collections of stories, as so much "art" and "literature" is today, nor are they haphazard collections of empirical facts or worse as so much 'science' is today. They are intellectual exercises of the highest order, and there are few or none taking place now. 

Stories are always "adapted" to suit their times. Just as our modern world does now, ancient scholars distorted old myths as time went by.  Just as now, to suit their politics, their audiences and their times, the ancients dramatized old tales, altered story lines and dialogue, added characters, created new scenes, tailored presentations, and changed plot development.  

Eratosthenes of Cyrene (c.285 - c.194 BC) compiled a comprehensive handbook of astral mythology, the Catasterisms, by collecting constellation myths from all the previous traditions' versions that he could find. Eratosthenes altered the older stories, improving on them as he saw fit, devising new myths where he felt it necessary or desirable. Eratosthenes was a leading scholar of the Hellenistic era. He was both a scientist and a poet, and the third director of the great library at Alexandria, the greatest library of the then known world. Eratosthenes's Catasterisms became established as the definitive source, the canon, for the genre of Constellation myths and all subsequent recounting. 

Constellation myths are a particular genre of myth, all their own. Constellation myths explained how persons, places, things, and creatures became constellations set in the sky. They were developed deliberately, and at a relatively late period, namely the fifth century onward.   After Eratosthenes established his definitive Catasterisms synthesis in the third century, the canon of Constellation myths became largely fixed and even though Eratosthenes' compendium hasn't survived, Gaius Julius Hyginus (c.64 BC. - AD 17) used Eratosthenes' Catasterisms as his source, directly and indirectly, for all his later recounting of astral myths.


***


New York Grand Central Station snaps into focus. Digital artists and photographers Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg.

***

The writing of the Ancient Greeks used conduit metaphors; they packed concepts into story containers, and sent these out into the world, along channels and conduits, to listeners who could unpack them. The receiver took the concept out of the container and made sense of it; in modern parlance, they "unpacked" it. This ancient approach is long gone, incomprehensible to our impatient minds. Since most of us can no longer follow a simple story uninterrupted from beginning to end, we certainly can't connect any dots.

A metaphor is understanding and experiencing one kind of thing in terms of another.  In contrast to our modern narrow and pervasive use of metaphors, the Ancient Greeks deployed their complex concept of metaphor for very specific purposes, as conduit metaphors, as tools. They used conduit metaphors to teach, heal, store and compare complex data, enlighten, and entertain, among other things. The reason any of this has survived at all, and is remotely graspable by our modern feeble brains, is that they were masters at their craft and knew what they were doing. 

***


Popeye Jack-In-The_Box; first comes Popeye's can of spinach, out of which pops Popeye.

***

It's no easy task to sort through centuries of alterations and changes to find what's basic and essential. There are endless versions but much has not survived except by references to it.  With the genre of Constellation myths, for example, one must trace Eratosthenes's sources, if they can be found, because Eratosthenes substantially altered those myths.  Nevertheless, variations do exist, much as survived in part or whole, and by overlapping the versions, commonalities emerge that remain and are common in some form to all versions, and can be regarded as belonging to the oldest structure. 

The process is much the same as when a lifetime appointed judge overlaps a plethora of witness's testimonies, in order to construct a grid from common elements found in all their variables, and this construct can then be used as a basis for truth. 

The scholars Peter and Iona Opie researched children's games, pastimes, stories, and rhymes using similar compilation methods. Tracing sources and variations across countries and ages, and critically examining all of these as a group, they found common denominators such as rhymes' references to a house on fire, really a symbol for a red evening sky. Joseph Campbell's life work with myths also used similar methods, and yielded similar results, for example, his famous book "The Hero Of A Thousand Faces". 

Aside from the scientist Buckminster Fuller, the only modern writer that comes to mind other than these scholars, who is able to mimic these processes in the slightest is the literary writer J. R. R. Tolkien. He too knew what he was doing, and he also knew what it took to do it. Read any single line of Tolkien's writing out of context and instantly, you're not in Kansas anymore. Even one line reveals itself as only a tiny chip of the tip of a mighty iceberg, one of many such floating in an ocean of the scholar's resources. 

All these people have dealt with similar challenges with their work in this world. 

There are as many approaches and reasons to examine these stories as there are stories. However, when countless versions are examined using the compendium overlapping grid approach, a hypothesis emerges indicating many of these ancient stories are not at all what they appear to be on the surface. These may not be stories at all, not as we know them today, but deliberate instructions in chemical theory. 

From a compendium of these myths, plus adding the chemistry knowledge we can demonstrate the ancients were likely to have possessed, an alternative hypothesis emerges all on its' own. For example, by keeping the ancient's knowledge of chemistry and their use of conduit metaphors in mind, the precisely documented endless lists of indiscriminate and promiscuous liaisons, explicitly retained along with all their remarkable details and particulars, can be understood instead as lessons in creating valid chemical compounds. Using this approach, it's remarkably straightforward to "unpack" valid chemistry formulas and instructions from these myths; they begin to "make sense".


***


Jan Cossiers, 1637, Prometheus Stealing Fire. Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, Spain.

***

For more information on metaphors, see:
Lakoff, George and Johnson, Mark   Metaphors We Live By University of Chicago Press, 1980, Chapters 1–3. (pp. 3–13).

***

GO TO TOP 

***

9. ALGEBRA VERSUS EUCLID'S ELEMENTS: Bean Counting versus Critical Judgement

***

Algebra is a modern addition; geometry with algebra is a very powerful scientific tool reaching its highest development in the calculus, which, in fact, was invented by Newton and Leibniz at the end of the 17th century.  

***


Faux Einsteins taking selfies.

 

***

Dr. J. A. Calvert has this point to make:
"While algebra had been an important addition to mathematics in the immediately preceding centuries, it provided mainly a notational convenience. A very significant convenience, to be sure, but it did not provide much additional power to mathematical investigations. Calculus, however, changed mathematics radically, and possessed great power and range, in practical matters as well as theoretical. Calculus involves a convenient representation of certain limiting processes, which were hinted at in earlier mathematics, but were very difficult to use, and then only in particular problems. " (The Elements of Calculus http://mysite.du.edu/~jcalvert/math/calculus.htm)


***


Elementos geométricos de Euclides lamina apéndice Arquímedes 1689.

***

Euclid's Elements represent something entirely different. In the Elements, the Pythagorean theorem is embedded in a stream of logic starting from simple beginnings and extending to complex and unexpected conclusions, and this structure is found nowhere else. The one unique factor in Western thought and science was its' foundations in the Elements of Euclid. This truly remarkable arrangement of intellect is an essential intellectual tool of the utmost practical utility. In other words, it's magic.

***


A "pop up" version: fold up geometrical illustrations in the first English edition of Euclid’s ‘Elements of Geometry,’ published London, 1570. John Dee wrote a mathematical preface to the book, now in the  library of the Royal College of Physicians.

***

Genuine Mathematics has only been cultivated by advanced cultures. The Greek mathematics displayed in the Elements is unique and completely different from all other similar forms of its' time, going far beyond counting and mathematical recreations into another world, that appears nowhere else, in any equivalent form. It represents a turning point in the mental ability of our species, one for the better, and in direct counterpoint, pun intended, to the path we are on now. As such, it is DANGEROUS. Until the late 19th century, Euclid was the school text for geometry. It has now vanished from schools, even in simplified editions. It is considered too difficult for the modern pupil, not to mention the teachers. 

Incredibly full of essential information, Euclid's Elements was intended as an introduction to Geometry and has been used that way for two millennia.  The text of the Elements that we have is written in the literary Koine typical of the 1st century AD. It wasn't written for beginners, and a fairly wide knowledge is needed to begin it. 

***


Euclid's Elements, 1573 Edition, open to the title page in Koine Greek.

***

The material can't be fully grasped at a first reading; it's not "calculation" but an exercise in reason using words, requiring both intelligence and effort. 

What precisely are The Elements? The Elements are a collection of works on the fundamentals of plane and solid geometry that form a basis for advanced work. They were assembled from existing knowledge around 300 BC, shortly after the foundation of the library at Alexandria. The text of the Elements is the result of a millennium of editing and recopying, of additions and deletions, and "improvements" by commentators. The Elements were built on a foundation stretching back to the geometry of Thales of Miletus (624-547 BC), considered one of the Seven Wise Men of the ancient world. They include the knowledge of Pythagoras, born in Samos in 582 BC, Eudoxus (408-355), Plato, Aristotle and Menaechmus, discoverer of the conic sections. Later, Archimedes (287-212 BC), Eratosthenes (b. 284 BC), Apollonius of Perga (fl. 220 BC), and Ptolemy (fl. 150) advanced geometry and astronomy greatly, and geometry was still actively pursued in the time of Proclus (410-485) of Athens, and Pappus (fl. 320) of Alexandria, but ceased in the disorders and intellectual collapse as the Western World turned to superstition. 

***


Contributors.  Homère (780 av. J.-C. - 720 av. J.-C.) - Le Prince des poètes - Herodotes.

***

Euclid is the name given to the man who supposedly supervised the collection, the "editor in chief" so to speak. We know absolutely nothing about him other than he worked in Alexandria and is sometimes erroneously conflated with Euclid of Megara, who was another philosopher entirely. Spurious data abounds; there were websites presuming to give dates and biographies of him, all of which is utter nonsense. 

***


Old mathematicians never die; they just go off on a tangent.

***

Euclid's Elements by no means a small or easily understood body of work but it is, incidentally, correct. Much of the work, especially the more advanced parts, were lost, and we know little of the lives of the geometers who were contributors. The Arabs preserved much what has survived, and although they added very little, they deserve great credit for this.

***


Nasrudeen Tusi's Record of Euclid's Proof of the Pythagorean theorem.

***


Geometrical shape from Suhayl al-Quhi book.

***

If you know some Greek but not Geometry, it's an easier road. Greek is a living language with a continuous tradition of three millennia, and it has been subject to constant evolution all this time; there cannot be a single 'correct' authority.

If you know some Geometry but not Greek, your road will be hard. It takes a great deal of work to become accustomed to the Greek alphabet, and then the grammar and vocabulary. Think of it as an exercise in decoding and hopefully it will awaken your desire to learn Greek properly. 

If you know neither Geometry nor Greek, you've got the hardest task of all, but it will be invaluable to you, and is guaranteed to open doors whose existence you barely suspected. 

Clearly, what is essential above all is a fascination with both Greek and Geometry, a combination almost nonexistent in today's world. 

***


Page from 1482 first printed Euclid's Elements of Geometry.


***

Page from 1482 first printed Euclid's Elements of Geometry; easier to read this way!

***

So how do you spark this flame? And why? Why cultivate such an impossible motivation and fascination? Consequences. That's the answer. By fully comprehending the risk reward ratio, you'll understand what's at stake if you don't, and the reward if you do. 
Newton used the style of Euclid, that of formal propositions and proofs, in his Principia, a method which still has much to recommend it, and which is still observed in principle in mathematics. Euclid was regarded as fundamental to the training of a scientist. The Elements' mood and emphasis on rigour, on analysis and teaching the methods and forms of proof, lie at the root of the new scientific method, where experimental facts provided the postulates and also guaranteed their validity. There's good reason for this: "common sense" led to the scientific errors in Aristotle, and only rigour leads to truth. Euclid firmly connects modern science with ancient, Newton with Archimedes. 


***


Euclid Vatican manuscript, number 190, Book I Proposition 47. 

 

***

Buckminster Fuller used the same self-evident unfolding structure when he wrote up his life work in Synergetics; the lack of modern comprehension of this remarkably straight-forward work is shown by the voluminous publications trying to explain it. From the introduction so Synergetics I: "Synergetics discloses the excruciating awkwardness characterizing present-day mathematical treatment of the interrelationships of the independent scientific disciplines as originally occasioned by their mutual and separate lacks of awareness of the existence of a comprehensive, rational, coordinating system inherent in nature."  Synergetics, Sec. 200.01-203.07

***


 Euclid's Elements, 1726.

***

To find yourself a copy of the Elements, Dr. J. A. Calvert makes the following recommendations. I have copied them here verbatim, as the University of Denver has been in the process of removing his website. And yes, I've written them and protested vociferously, to no avail. Should the site be down when you read this, email me for a copy.
Greek For Euclid: Contents http://mysite.du.edu/~etuttle/classics/nugreek/contents.htm

***


 Euclid's Elements, 1726. Book's spine.

***

"The best modern translation and commentary on Euclid is the work by T. L. Heath, Euclid's Elements, 2nd ed., 3 vols., (New York: Dover Publications, 1956). An excellent small volume containing I. i's edition of 1862, based on Simson, was published in the Everyman's Library (London: Dent and New York: Dutton), the last printing being, apparently, in 1967. This series seems no longer to be published, which is a pity, and it is a greater pity that Euclid is not easily available to the intelligent. If you want to learn about Geometry, a 20th-century school textbook (from when there were such things) is a bad place to begin. Mathematical knowledge among the public is declining to practically nothing, except for mere calculation. The definitive text is Euclidis Elementa, by I. L. Heiberg (Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1883), which is the source of all the text in these pages. This work is currently quite difficult to obtain, although a good library may possess a copy. In it, Greek text is on the left-hand pages, with a Latin translation on the right, with footnotes explaining the sources and variant readings. The best and earliest sources for Euclid seem to be a Vatican parchment of the 10th century, discovered by Peyrard in 1808, and some earlier palimpsests in the British Museum from the 7th and 8th centuries. The thought of ignorant, quasi-literate monks scraping off Euclid to replace it by credulous fables still elicits disgust, and shows how contrary superstition is to reason. No Euclid was preserved in Western Europe. Adelard of Bath (fl.1116-1142) made the first Latin translation from the Arabic of al-Hajjaj (fl. 786-833), who had translated it from Greek at the court of Caliph Harun-ar-Rashid, whence it came to Spain, thence to England."

***


Dover publishers; three book edition containing all thirteen books of the elements as volumes 1, 2, and 3, 2nd Edition, Heath translation.

***

Dr. J. A. Calvert's website had, at last check, introductions to Greek for Euclid and Latin. Still online as of 171030, here are those links:

Greek For Euclid
http://mysite.du.edu/%7Eetuttle/classics/nugreek/contents.htm#conts

Latin
http://mysite.du.edu/%7Eetuttle/classics/latin/learnlat.htm 

***


Leonardo Da Vinci (15 April 1452 – 2 May 1519) used Euclid's Elements;  Vitruvian Vitruvius Lives Of The Artists.

***

 

***

GO TO TOP 

***

10. TO CONCLUDE

***


Recovery: Expectations versus Reality.

***

Nobody will pay you to study Euclid's Elements. Nobody is paid to study Analytical Mechanics. Unless a writer produces propaganda, they haven't much chance at earning a living wage. Unless programmers create invasive technology and entertainment propaganda, they aren't paid either. There is no longer any such thing as a "Doctor of Medicine" in the true sense of the Hippocratic Oath.


***


Writer's Blocked robot.

***

Again, a great many problems had their start in the past, and for most of the modern ones, this isn't their first run. There are times in the past when our thinking was much clearer than it is now, and those times hold answers far more insightful and significant than we are capable of now.  I study the past for answers as thoroughly as I scour the present for clues. 

It takes enormous effort to go against any cultural tide. The good news is in the irony: the irony is that there is, in fact, so much data, that no matter how much data is deliberately scrambled, nothing can be totally hidden when you know how to look for it. Physics and magnets work; belief is not required, nor is knowledge of them. 

***


Scaling Pythagorus.

***

However, perceiving that the problem exists is always the first challenge, and as Winston Churchill said, "Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." There is a "way out" and it requires hard work. The question then changes into "We Will Find An Answer'. And sure enough, we do.  

This is why I study old documents, and why I'm sharing the results with you.

Thanks for reading.


********

***


Mecanismele profunde ale istoriei. Istoria explicată. Unde începe şi unde se termină istoria umană. Cursul de prof. dr. Yuval Harari .
Westerner and Arab practicing geometry; 15th century manuscript.

***


 

 

****

 

GO TO TOP 

***

11. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES


***


Euclid's portrait in thus edition of the Elements.

***

The sources for the material in the Archetypes series are listed in one place,  #40 Archetypes Additional Resources:
 https://suityourself.international/appanage/index.php?_a=newsletter&newsletter_id=88
or
https://www.suityourself.international/appanage/magazine-40.html

In addition, if you're interested in further exploring the specific topics in this issue, then I also recommend the resources below. 

BERNAYS, Edward L.
"Our Dept to Propaganda", Propaganda, 1928, Liverright. "The prejudice and well-known weaknesses of human nature are to be exploited and encouraged."

CALVERT,  Dr. J. A. Professor emeritus, Engineering, University of Denver, Colorado:
Greek For Euclid
http://mysite.du.edu/%7Eetuttle/classics/nugreek/contents.htm#conts
Latin

CRAWFORD, Kate
"Why Personal Tech Is Depressing"
Microsoft & NYU Researcher, The AI Now Institute and New York University
WSJ "The Future of Everything" November / December, 2017 Pages 47-48
Screen addiction studies show the same immediate withdrawal symptoms as substance abuse.

FULLER, R. Buckminster (1895-1983) 
Synergetics: Explorations in the Geometry of Thinking  (First Published by Macmillan Publishing Co. Inc. 1975, 1979.)
Online: http://www.rwgrayprojects.com/synergetics/synergetics.html
"Synergetics discloses the excruciating awkwardness characterizing present-day mathematical treatment of the interrelationships of the independent scientific disciplines as originally occasioned by their mutual and separate lacks of awareness of the existence of a comprehensive, rational, coordinating system inherent in nature."  Synergetics, Sec. 200.01-203.07
Hardcover: 876 pages Publisher: Macmillan (January 1, 1975) Language: English
ISBN-10: 002541870X ISBN-13: 978-0025418707
and 
Synergetics 2: Explorations in the Geometry of Thinking
Hardcover: 592 pages Publisher: MacMillan Publishing Company; 1st edition (December 1979) Language: English
ISBN-10: 0025418807 ISBN-13: 978-0025418806


GATTO, John Taylor 
The Underground History of American Education, 2001 (ISBN 0-945700-05-9, pbk. ISBN 0-945700-04-0). 
Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling, 1992 (ISBN 086571231X) .
'Against School', 2003 (Complete Text Online at http://www.wesjones.com/gatto1.htm)
Weapons of Mass Instruction: A Schoolteacher's Journey through the Dark World of Compulsory Schooling, 2008 (ISBN 0-86571-631-5)

GAY, Jason
"Don't Play The Hits"
NFL Quarterback Drew Bres discusses the long term physical impact of contact sports, suggests alternatives, and discusses the widespread longstanding denial of the posthumous diagnosis of cerebral difficulties associated with contact sports, as well as his work to offer flag football as a viable alternative at the school level.
WSJ "The Future of Everything" November / December, 2017 Page 70-72

HARD, Robin
Eratosthenes and Hyginus Constellation Myths with Aratus's Phaenomena
A new translation by Robin Hard
2015, Oxford University Press, ISBN #978-0-19-871698-3.

HOPKINS, Michael and DEHGHANTANHA, Ali
School of Computing, Science and Engineering
University of Salford
Manchester, United Kingdom
International Conference On Information Security and Cyber Forensics InfoSec2015
Exploit Kits: The Production Line of the Cybercrime Economy
http://doi.org/10.1109/InfoSec2015.7435501

JOHNSTONE, C. Douglas ("Doug") D.C.M.
Special thanks for a private communication on the lifelong repercussions and ramifications of stressed ligaments, and "slight" and "minor" concussions.

KOCH, Christof
"Keeping Up With The Machines" by Christof Koch, president and chief scientist of the Allen Institute of Brain Science in Seattle. WSJ article of Saturday / Sunday October 28-29, 2017.

KRUGER, Justin and DUNNNG, David
(1999). "Unskilled and unaware of it: How difficulties in recognizing one's own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. American Psychological Association. 77 (6): 1121–1134. 


LAKOFF, George and JOHNSON, Mark
Metaphors We Live By
University of Chicago Press, 1980, Chapters 1–3. (pp. 3–13).
http://mysite.du.edu/%7Eetuttle/classics/latin/learnlat.htm 


NICOLELIS, Dr. Miguel
Dr. Miguel Nicolelis, in the WSJ Article "The Perils of Putting A Chip In Your Brain"  (page 58, WSJ "The Future of Everything, November - December 2017.)


VOLVELLES
For more information on the volvelle, please see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volvelle
and
http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/decoding-the-medieval-volvelle/


****


***

Here's Looking At Euclid!
***
 

***

FAIR USE NOTICE: This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. I am making such material available in my efforts to advance understanding of issues of environmental and humanitarian significance. I believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

***
 

I sign our magazine articles "See Into The Invisible". Thanks for reading.
Best Wishes,
Debra Spencer

***

171111 Suit Yourself™ International Magazine #41 Archetype - Nescience Is The Price For Losing Euclid.'All Content is © Debra Spencer, Suit Yourself International. Technical Library FAQ Index ISSN
2474-820X. All Rights Reserved.

****
****

 

All Content is © Debra Spencer, Suit Yourself™ International. Technical Library FAQ Index ISSN 2474-820X. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce in part or in whole without express written consent. Thank you.

GO TO TOP 

Top
All Content is ©2019 Debra Spencer, Appanage™at www.suityourself.international Suit Yourself ™ International, 120 Pendleton Point, Islesboro Island, Maine, 04848, USA 44n31 68w91 Technical Library FAQ Index ISSN 2474-820X. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce in part or in whole without express written consent. Thank you.

Read Our Magazine! A Fortune Cookie Once A Week.

Enter your e-mail address to receive our magazine.
Email
Country
Please enter a valid email address.
Email address already subscribed.
All Content is ©2019 Debra Spencer, Appanage™at www.suityourself.international Suit Yourself ™ International, 120 Pendleton Point, Islesboro Island, Maine, 04848, USA 44n31 68w91 Technical Library FAQ Index ISSN 2474-820X. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce in part or in whole without express written consent. Thank you.
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm. ~ Winston Churchill